Events

< Past Asian Studies Center events

MAR
24
Date:
Sunday, 24 Mar 2019
Time:
1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B122
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Muhi: Generally Temporary
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

A film by Rina Castelnuovo and Tamir Elterman, 2017. For seven years Muhi, a brave and spirited boy from Gaza, has been living in Tel Hashomer, an Israeli hospital, the only home he has ever known. Caught between two homes and two peoples, he is raised by Israeli volunteers in the hospital and his grandfather.

And Then She Arrived 
3:15 - 5:30 p.m.

A Charming romantic comedy about Dan Freilich, a handsome, easy-going nerd who is quite sure his future is organized for the next 50 years. The plan is that soon he will marry Tamar, his high school sweetheart. That's all he needs...until he meets Meirav, a waitress from Jerusalem. Followed by a complimentary dinner catered by Woody's Oasis Mediterranean Deli.

Shoelaces
6:30-8:45 p.m.

A film by Jacob Goldwasser, 2018. Moving, crowd-pleasing drama about the complicated relationship between an aging father and his special-needs son. Reuben's kidneys are failing and his son Gadi wants to donate one of his own kidneys to help save his father's life. However, the transplant committee objects, claiming that Reuben, Gadi's sole legal guardian, has a conflict of interest. 

Sponsored by the Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel

Co-sponsored by James Madison College, the Lester and Jewell Morris Hillel Jewish Student Center, the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of English, the Department of History, the Department of Linguistics & Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African Languages, the Asian Studies Center, Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities, and the College of Arts and Letters.

MAR
25
Date:
Monday, 25 Mar 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B115
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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The Unorthodox 
A film by Eliran Malka, 2018. When Yakov Cohen's daughter is expelled from school for ethnic reasons, he decides to fight back. It's 1983 and Yakov is just a regular guy. But he has the will and the passion to take action, and a belief that he and other Sephardic Jews should be able to hold their heads up proudly. 

Sponsored by the Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel 

Co-sponsored by James Madison College, the Lester and Jewell Morris Hillel Jewish Student Center, the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of English, the Department of History, the Department of Linguistics & Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African Languages, the Asian Studies Center, Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities, and the College of Arts and Letters.

MAR
27
Date:
Wednesday, 27 Mar 2019
Time:
5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Location:
201 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Author Jeff Lilley will speak about his book Have the Mountains Fallen? Two Journeys of Loss and Redemption in the Cold War traces the lives of these two men as they confronted the full threat and legacy of the Soviet empire. Through narratives of loss, love, and longing for a homeland forever changed, a clearer picture emerges of the struggle for freedom inside the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

Please email ceres(at)isp.msu.edu for more information regarding this event. 

 

Co-Sponsored by: James Madison College; Asian Studies Center; and Center for European, Russian and Eurasion Studies.

Date:
Wednesday, 27 Mar 2019
Time:
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU International Center Room 302
Department:
Asian Studies Center
MAR
28
Date:
Thursday, 28 Mar 2019
Time:
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall Rooms A328, A330
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Date:
Thursday, 28 Mar 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Location:
105 S. Kedzie Hall
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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A boy named Sen (Wu Zhi-Xuan) struggles to cope with the recent death of his older brother. While his mother works each night at a local convenience store, Sen rides his bike around their suburb. He does homework in a fast food restaurant, hanging out at a manhwa (comics) library, and searching through his later brother's mobile telephone. Via the telephone Sen learns that his brother was a regular viewer of a streaming videocast. Through the cast he contacts its presenter, an elderly woman known simply as Granny (Nina Paw). Granny is a taxi driver suffering from stage 4 lung cancer and has been given three months to live. She obstinately insists she will make it to day 100. Together she and Sen make an unexpected connection and develop a stronger acceptance of death between them.

Co-Sponsors: Asian pop-up Cinema, Asian Studies Center, Center for Gender in Global Context, Chinese Program, Film Studies Program, Global Studies in the Art & Humanities, LGBT Resource Center, Ministry of Education of R.O.C. (Taiwan), Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Chicago

MAR
29
Date:
Friday, 29 Mar 2019
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
115 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Professor Manalansan is Chair of the Minority Scholars Committee of the American Studies Association. His current book projects include the ethical and embodied dimensions of the lives and struggles of undocumented queer immigrants, Asian American immigrant culinary cultures, sensory, the affective dimensions of Filipino migrant labor, and Filipino return migration.

In an era where cultural appropriation in the arts are part of raging debates while in other venues, culinary pundits have declared Filipino cuisine as the "newest foodie trend," this presentation utilizes experiences of Filipino Americans as pivots for exposing the tensions and ambivalent energies of these two ongoing events. Idioms of shame and the migrant investments in culinary authenticity have become ingredients for an unpalatable smorgasbord of ideas, attitudes and politics. Instead, the argument turns to a queer anthropological framework that regurgitates shame and appropriation into openings rather than barriers to culinary cultural capaciousness. For more information please contact the Department of Anthropology at anpdept(at)msu.edu.

There will be a reception after the talk. 

 

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology 

Co-Sponosred by the Asian Pacific American Studies Program; Asian Studies Center; Center for Gender in Global Context (GenCen); Food@MSU

 

Date:
Friday, 29 Mar 2019
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
115 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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In humans and humanoid robots alike, gender—femininity, masculinity—constitutes an array of learned behaviors that are cosmetically enabled and enhanced. In humans, these behaviors are both socially and historically shaped, but are also contingent upon many situational influences, including individual choices. I will explore the sex/gender dynamicsinforming the design and embodiment of artificial intelligence (AI) and robots, especially humanoids. AsIshow, advanced technology does not necessarily promote social progress but can be deployed to reinforce conservative models ofsex/genderroles, ethnic nationalism, and "traditional" family structures.

 

Sponsored by Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities

Co-Sponsored by the Academic Advancement Network; Asian Studies Center; Centerfor Genderin Global Context (GenCen); CenterforInterdisciplinarity; College of Arts and Letters; Department of Linguistics and Languages; Diversity Research Network; Graphic Narratives Network; Japan Council; LBGT Resource Center

APR
1
Date:
Monday, 01 Apr 2019
Time:
6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
International Center Room 303
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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"Aggressive." "Rivalry." "Warning." "Deepening rifts." The sensationalism of such terms in recent headlines makes it hard to develop a nuanced understanding of China today and its role in the world. This symposium series will examine several high profile topics about China's emerging presence in the world to offer complexity, divergent and multiple perspectives, and analytic insight about China that goes beyond the headlines. The goal is a public discussion, grounded in scholarship that makes possible open and informed dialogue. This panel will focus on US-China trade relations, and there will be plenty of time for audience Q&A. This series is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Panelists:

David Firestein (Executive Director of the University of Texas at Austin's China Public Policy Center)

Eric Freedman (Chair of the MSU Knight Center for Environmental Journalism)

Jean Schtokal (Shareholder at Foster Swift Collins & Smith, P.C. and Executive in Residence for MSU CIBER)

Mary Gallagher (Director of the University of Michigan's Center for Chinese Studies).

 

The symposium series is sponsored by the following MSU units: African Studies Center, Asian Studies Center, China Council, Office of China Programs, and Office of International Studies in Education.

APR
9
Date:
Tuesday, 09 Apr 2019
Time:
9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Location:
Wells Hall Rooms B342
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Basilius Bawardi (Bar IIIan University) will be talking about Cultural & Linguistic Diversity in the Middle East.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Linguistics & Languages, Arabic Program, Hebrew Program, College of Arts & Letters, Global Studies in the Arts & Humanities, Asian Studies Center, and Muslim Studies Program.