Events

< Past Asian Studies Center events

FEB
20
Date:
Wednesday, 20 Feb 2019
Time:
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU International Center Room 302
Department:
Asian Studies Center
FEB
22
Date:
Friday, 22 Feb 2019
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU Union Multicultural unity Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Helen Zia is a Fulbright Scholar and a graduate of Princeton University's first coeducational class. She attended medical school but quit after completing two years, then went to work as a construction laborer, an autoworker, and a community organizer, after which she discovered her life's work as a writer. 

She is the author of Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People, a finalist for the prestigious Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize and referred to by President Bill Clinton in two separate speeches in the Rose Garden. She coauthored, with Wen Ho Lee, My Country Versus Me, which reveals what happened to the Los Alamos scientist who was falsely accused of being a spy for China in the "worst case since the Rosenbergs." She was Executive Editor of Ms. Magazine and is a founding board co-chair of the Women's Media Center. Her articles, essays and reviews have appeared in numerous publications, books and anthologies, receiving awards for her ground-breaking stories.

FEB
25
Date:
Monday, 25 Feb 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU Main Library, Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel
Department:
Asian Studies Center
FEB
27
Date:
Wednesday, 27 Feb 2019
Time:
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU Union Lake Superior Room
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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It is entirely possible to live abroad in a country where we hardly speak the language and not improve in fluency at all. Even in regard to language-oriented programs, the research is inconclusive about how much proficiency learners can be expected to gain and what factors will lead to those gains. Nevertheless, we firmly believe that a strategic and flexible effort to acquire language while abroad, whether the program requires it or not, can diminish the impact of "language shock" (Agar, 1994) and enhance the overall benefits of the overseas experience.

In this presentation, we will focus on language and culture in terms of dynamic skill sets that will continue to develop during a sojourn abroad rather than static content that must be acquired beforehand. Drawing on theories of intercultural competence and situated learning, we will present frameworks that can be used to design training and reflective tasks before, during, and after a study abroad program. Specifically, we will offer examples of investigative, interactive, and reflective tasks that can develop intercultural skills, support the emergence of community in a program cohort, and encourage engagement with communities in the local context while abroad. As time allows, we will workshop these tasks with participants to adapt them to the type, focus, and location of particular programs.

Presenters:

Dr. Felix Kronenberg is the Director of the Center for Language Teaching Advancement, an academic unit that supports foreign language teaching, research, and outreach at MSU and beyond. He is also a professor in the German department and a national and international leader in regard to language learning technology, gamification, and innovative language resource centers.

Dr. Amanda Lanier is faculty in CeLTA and Director of the MA in Foreign Language Teaching, an online program with students and alumni in 30 states and 10 countries that develops master teachers of over a dozen foreign languages. Her research and teaching focus on motivation, identity, culture, and other aspects of language acquisition, as well as sociocultural learning processes in online courses.

For more information or to register, please contact Kris Windorski at windorsk(at)msu.edu.

FEB
28
Date:
Thursday, 28 Feb 2019
Time:
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall Rooms A328, A330
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Date:
Thursday, 28 Feb 2019
Time:
8:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building Room 1410
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Refreshments will be served in the BPS atrium at 7:30 pm, Free parking is available in the Abrams Planetarium parking lot

Neutrinos are sub-atomic particles which are very difficult to observe. They have been assumed to have no mass. It was predicted that, if they have masses, they could change their type while they fly. This phenomena is called neutrino oscillations. Neutrino oscillations was discovered by deep underground neutrino experiments. I will discuss the discovery of neutrino oscillations. The implications of the discovery of the neutrino oscillations and the small neutrino masses will also be discussed. For more information please contact Kim Crosslan at crosslan(at)pa.msu.edu.

 

Sponsored by the College of Natural Science and MSU Department of Physics and Astronomy

MAR
1
Date:
Friday, 01 Mar 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Location:
International Center 303
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Professor Takaaki Kaijita, Nobel Laureate and Director of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, will be talking about neutrinos. Nuetrinos are sub-atomic particles which are very difficult to observe. Kaijita will discuss the discovery of neutrino oscillations. The implications of the discovery of the neutrino oscillations and the small neutrino masses will also be discussed. A light luncheon will be provided.

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Center, College of Natural Science, and MSU Department of Physics and Astronomy

MAR
10
Date:
Sunday, 10 Mar 2019
Time:
2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
115 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Meditation and the Higher Consciousness (3:00PM - 4:00PM)
Meditation is a practice with the potential to affect us on the physical, psychological, and spiritual levels. Simple techniques can produce relatively quick physical and psychological effects, such as releasing stress or improving our attention span and power of concentration. However, meditation can be much more than that. In this talk, we will explore how meditation can help us become aware of our spiritual nature, which is the source of peace and harmony.
 
Blavatsky's Diagram of Meditation (5:00PM - 6:00PM)
H. P. Blavatsky was a co-Founder of the Theosophical Society, and a pioneer in blending Eastern and Western spirituality. In the late 1880s, she gave her students a Diagram of Meditation meant to encourage a process of spiritual transformation from the limited perception of our ego (or personal self) to that of the divine self. The Diagram offers a comprehensible approach that is not limited to instructions for sitting meditation, but also includes a set of attitudes to be practiced during daily life.
 
Sponsored by the Asian Studies Center, Anshu Varna, Center for Gender in Global Context (GenCen)

 

MAR
11
Date:
Monday, 11 Mar 2019
Time:
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
International Center 303
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Since uncontrolled emotions and desires cloud our perception, spiritual traditions tend to regard them as a hindrance in the search for truth. Consequently, many religions and philosophies promote the development of detachment and equanimity. Our emotional dimension, however, is an important aspect of our being. Feelings such as love and compassion are recognized as essential for a spiritual life. This program will explore the role of emotion and desire in the spiritual path, as well as ways to deal with conflicting desires and negative emotions.
 
Sponsored by the Asian Studies Center, Anshu Varna, Center for Gender in Global Context (GenCen)
MAR
12
Date:
Tuesday, 12 Mar 2019
Time:
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
International Center Room 303
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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When faced with challenges in daily life, we respond with physical, emotional or intellectual actions. Although these responses may be appropriate to deal with situations on a practical level, they are rarely able to address the root cause of the problems we encounter. J. Krishnamurti and the non-duality teachings in different spiritual traditions propose that there is a higher faculty in us—choiceless awareness—which can bring about a fundamental change in ourselves and society. 

 

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Center, Anshu Varna, Center for Gender in Global Context (GenCen)