Events


MAR
24
Date:
Friday, 24 Mar 2017
Time:
3:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
201 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Camelia Suleiman has a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Georgetown University, with a specialization in Sociolinguistics and Discourse Analysis. Her research interest is in the area of language and identity in relation to gender, politicians' use of language in the media, and national identity, in both the American and the Arab countries' contexts. She has also received a number of awards and recognition including an award for 'distinguished women in academia' from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. At MSU, she serves as the Arabic language coordinator, as well as she has been directing the Arabic Flagship Program.

MAR
28
Date:
Tuesday, 28 Mar 2017
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details
A lecture by Ive Covaci, Lecturer of Art History at Fairfield University.
 
In the Kamakura period (1185-1333), illustrated scrolls depicting the origin stories of famous temples and shrines became a popular genre of painting. Embedded within, and often forming the focus of, temple foundation legends are stories about the main icons enshrined at the temples. As the painted legends both show and tell us, these sculptures frequently have miraculous origins: they appear suddenly of their own accord, they are carved by gods appearing in the guise of human sculptors, they reveal their desire to be created in dream visions, they come to life and move about, or they refuse to move once installed in a certain place. This lecture will present several Kamakura-period illustrated scrolls depicting miraculous icons, and will discuss how sculptures are brought to life for patrons and devotees through painted tales.
 
Ive Covaci is a lecturer in Art History at Fairfield University in Fairfield, CT. She is the editor of Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan (Yale UP and Asia Society, 2016) and was the co-curator of the exhibition with the same title at Asia Society Museum in New York in the spring of 2016.

 

MAR
29
Date:
Wednesday, 29 Mar 2017
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
305 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Arabic Diwan is a gathering of Arabic students who are in the Arabic program, where they speak hte language and learn about the culture in a relaxed environemnt with our Fulbright teaching assistant. Students from all Arabic language levels are encouraged to attend. Also, we extend the invitation to the Arabic-speaking students at the English Center.

Date:
Wednesday, 29 Mar 2017
Time:
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Location:
S107 South Kedzie
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

A documentary film on Muslim American voices in the 21st century by Salah D. Hassan and Swarnavel Pillai.

From October 2011 to May 2012, a series of public performances were held in Michigan to explore the different ways that Muslims in the U.S. have negotiated the relationship between their faith and society. The result was an extended dialog with Muslim-Americans on a range of issues, from the wearing of a hijab to the making of hip-hop music. These young MuslimAmericans challenge Islamophobia and pose questions to Muslim communities. "Migrations of Islam" is a documentary film that includes clips from the public performances and interviews with students, artists and experts to present the different ways that young Muslims in the United States have positioned themselves against the extremes of anti-Muslim rhetoric and conservative religious traditions, showing the different ways that contemporary forms of Islam are finding expression in the words, images, and actions of Americans.

MAR
30
Date:
Thursday, 30 Mar 2017
Time:
6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
A-201 and A-236 Wells Hall
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Practice speaking Korean with other students at our Korean Conversation table. All levels are welcome.

APR
2
Date:
Sunday, 02 Apr 2017
Time:
1:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B-122
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

The Jewish Studies Program will show four full-length Israeli films: Apples from the Desert, Arabic Movie, Baba Joon and Sand Storm. See pages 7 and 8 for more information on the festival. Co-sponsored by the Union Activities Board, the College of Arts and Letters, the Asian Studies Center, and James Madison College.

APR
4
Date:
Tuesday, 04 Apr 2017
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:45 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B-119
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

The Jewish Studies Program will show four full-length Israeli films: Apples from the Desert, Arabic Movie, Baba Joon and Sand Storm

APR
5
Date:
Wednesday, 05 Apr 2017
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
305 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Arabic Diwan is a gathering of Arabic students who are in the Arabic program, where they speak hte language and learn about the culture in a relaxed environemnt with our Fulbright teaching assistant. Students from all Arabic language levels are encouraged to attend. Also, we extend the invitation to the Arabic-speaking students at the English Center.

APR
10
Date:
Monday, 10 Apr 2017
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Part of the Asian Studies Center Colloquium on Transnational East Asia

In this presentation Professor Fujitani reads Clint Eastwood's critically acclaimed Unforgiven (1992) against Lee Sang-il's remake Yurusarezaru mono (2013). Fujitani argues that Lee's film, set in Hokkaido, is in many ways a radical and challenging exploration of key themes taken up by Eastwood. These include violence, law, the outlaw, sovereign power, the right to kill, and historical accountability. At the same time, Lee takes up several issues that Eastwood simply leaves as background to his story in particular race, indigeneity, and settler colonialism.
 
Takashi Fujitani is Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he is also the Dr. David Chu Professor in Asia-Pacific Studies. His major works include: Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996); Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans in WWII (UC Press, 2011) and Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (co-edited, Duke U. Press, 2001). He is also editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).
 
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Center
Co-sponsors: Asian Pacific American Studies Program, Department of History, Department of Religious Studies, Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities, Japan Council

 

Date:
Monday, 10 Apr 2017
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

A lecture by Craig Santos Perez.

This lecture is part of the 2017 Global Perspectives Colloquium:  Arts & Aesthetics in Archipelagic Contexts.

This colloquia centers artistic and scholarly works emerging from Oceania, East Asia, Africa, and Caribbean archipelagos. This archipelagic perspective will enable an engagement with the global impact and influence of what are often thought of as insular and isolated islands. With sustained attention to migration and diaspora, music and literary productions, and geopolitical symbolism and empire, this colloquia infuses archipelagic experiences into contemporary understandings of culture and society.