Events


FEB
20
Date:
Monday, 20 Feb 2017
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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A lecture by Petra Rivera Rideau.

This lecture is part of the 2017 Global Perspectives Colloquium:  Arts & Aesthetics in Archipelagic Contexts.

This colloquia centers artistic and scholarly works emerging from Oceania, East Asia, Africa, and Caribbean archipelagos. This archipelagic perspective will enable an engagement with the global impact and influence of what are often thought of as insular and isolated islands. With sustained attention to migration and diaspora, music and literary productions, and geopolitical symbolism and empire, this colloquia infuses archipelagic experiences into contemporary understandings of culture and society.

FEB
21
Date:
Tuesday, 21 Feb 2017
Time:
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Location:
2266 Kirkhof Center, Grand Valley State University
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Professor Chu Donwei, from the School of Interpreting and Translation Studies—Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, is currently studying at the Center for Translation Studies at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. He is founder and editor-in-chief of Chinese Literature and Culture, a print and online journal of translations from the Chinese. His latest book is The Wisdom of Huineng, Chinese Buddhist Philosopher: The Platform Sutra and Other Translations (IUniverse, 2015). He is the author of Lin Yutang as Author-Translator (in English, Shanghai Foreign Language Education, 2012), Translation as a Business (in Chinese, Hubei Education Press, 2003), and A Revolution: Learn to Learn English (in Chinese, Hubei Education Press, 2007), as well as the Chinese translator of Will Durant's On the Meaning of Life. He is a winner of the 14th Han Suyin (Elisabeth Comber) Translation Contest for Young Translators held by China Translators Journal (third prize, Chinese to English). He is an international Member of the American Literary Translators Association.

This presentation is conducted through the Fulbright Scholar Program's Outreach Lecturing Fund (OLF). OLF enables Visiting Scholars to share their research interests, speak about their home country, and exchange ideas with U.S. students, faculty, and community organizations. Through these lectures, universities forge relationships with the Fulbright Scholar Program, Visiting Scholars, and the Visiting Scholar's home and host institutions. 

FEB
22
Date:
Wednesday, 22 Feb 2017
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
305 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Arabic Diwan is a gathering of Arabic students who are in the Arabic program, where they speak hte language and learn about the culture in a relaxed environemnt with our Fulbright teaching assistant. Students from all Arabic language levels are encouraged to attend. Also, we extend the invitation to the Arabic-speaking students at the English Center.

FEB
24
Date:
Friday, 24 Feb 2017
Time:
10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B-243
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Yael Aronoff analyzes democracies fighting asymmetric wars, as they attempt to balance traditional military strategies of deterrence with pressures for restraint. Restraining factors include: mitigation of further resentment by affected populations; maintaining a political culture's self-identity as a democracy upholding democratic norms and international laws; and the importance of winning media battles. Dr. Aronoff will examine how international lawyers, military commanders, and non-governmental organizations have come together to reach consensus on what the restraints binding states in these wars should be. 

FEB
27
Date:
Monday, 27 Feb 2017
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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If nations are imagined, how does popular and mainstream cinema in India contribute to that imagination? What relationship does the fantastic and make-believe world of Bollywood  do to the idea of India? My talk will focus upon milestones in Hindi cinema (called Bollywood after liberalization of the 1990s) to demonstrate implicit and explicit interaction between cinema and socio-political contexts in India. In doing so, it will move back and forth between the nation's anxieties about gender, caste, religion, class and cinematic representations to show the real and reel cannot be seen in discrete terms but mutually constitutive entities. In  doing so I argue for cinema as an intersectional site that enables an understanding of both consolidation as well as diffusion of nation and its avowed goals.

Rita Kothari is a professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India. She is the author of Translating India: The Cultural Politics of English (St. Jerome Publishing, Manchester, rvd ed. Cambridge University Press, New Delhi) and The Burden of Refuge (rvd.ed. Orient Blackswan, New Delhi). She has co-translated Modern Gujarati Poetry (Sahitya Akademi, Delhi) and Coral Island: The Poetry of Niranjan Bhagat (Sahitya Akademi, Gandhinagar). Her translations of note are The Stepchild: Angaliayat (Oxford University Press, New Delhi), Speech and Silence: Literary Journeys by Gujarati Women (Zubaan, New Delhi) and Unbordered Memories: Partition Stories from Sindh (Penguin). She has co-edited Decentring Translation Studies: India and Beyond (John Benjamin Press, Amsterdam) and Chutnefying English: The Phenomenon of Hinglish (Penguin, forthcoming).

Date:
Monday, 27 Feb 2017
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
228 Erickson Hall
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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This talk examines the history of the Twitter novel in Japan and the use if that form in the immediate aftermath of the triple diadter of March 11, 2011. When the earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushiman catastrophes struck , telephone connections were dirsupted and mainstream media failed to provide immediate news citizens craved. So many turned to social media for facts streaming from the disasters, while a subset of the population took solace in fiction and poetry posted on those same venues. This talk examines the ways the short, micro, or flash fiction posted on twitter helped readers cope with the trauma, understand the events, and re-imagine possible futures.

Jonothan E. Abel is an Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at Penn State University. His recent work looks at the history of new media in Japan in order to examine the interrelations of representations and reality.

Reception to follow.

FEB
28
Date:
Tuesday, 28 Feb 2017
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Erickson Hall Room 252
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Date:
Tuesday, 28 Feb 2017
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Given the hectic nature of multiple languages in India, how does a nation sustain itself without a consensus upon a 'national' language? The talk will begin with the disputes regarding Hindi and English as two possible choices for the newly formed nation-state in 1947, and take the reader through the discourse on India's recognized and unrecognized languages/dialects to give a bird's eye-view on its everyday forms of multilingualism. It will also interweave into the narrative the production and reception of literature produced in Indian languages and the challenges to imagining an "Indian" literature.


Rita Kothari is a professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India. She is the author of Translating India: The Cultural Politics of English and The Burden of Refuge.
This is the second of a 3-part series centered around Rita Kothari's visit to MSU, coordinated with the Asian Studies Center and James Madison College, which includes: History of India through Bollywood on February 27 and Scarred Nations : Partition in the India Subcontinent on March 1.  More information on these programs can be found here.

MAR
1
Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Erickson Hall Room 133G
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Preparing for careers in international education development: Working in an international organization, NGO, foundation, and other non-university-based settings

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
JMC Library, 3rd Floor Case Hall
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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The territorial division of the Indian subcontinent into India and Pakistan, and eventually Bangladesh, is referred to as "Partition" in English. Indian languages have their own terms to describe this phenomenon and quite often, victims of this history provide in their oral testimonies versions that complicate the singularity of this event even further. My talk will provide the dialectics between history and memory, state and individuals to show how this "event" is constructed and remembered in diverse ways in India. I will focus largely on my research on Sindh and how its minorities migrated to India during Partition, their processes of rehabilitation and resettlement and also compare them with Sindhi speaking Muslims who have lived along the borders of Kutch and Rajasthan in India to argue that negotiation of borders is an everyday practice for some. Finally partition reincarnates itself through border making and border crossing practices in the subcontinent. I examine this in relation to language, literature, religion and nations at large.


Rita Kothari is a professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India. She is the author of Translating India: The Cultural Politics of English (St. Jerome Publishing, Manchester, rvd ed. Cambridge University Press, New Delhi) and The Burden of Refuge (rvd.ed. Orient Blackswan, New Delhi). She has co-translated Modern Gujarati Poetry (Sahitya Akademi, Delhi) and Coral Island: The Poetry of Niranjan Bhagat (Sahitya Akademi, Gandhinagar). Her translations of note are The Stepchild: Angaliayat (Oxford University Press, New Delhi), Speech and Silence: Literary Journeys by Gujarati Women (Zubaan, New Delhi) and Unbordered Memories: Partition Stories from Sindh (Penguin). She has co-edited Decentring Translation Studies: India and Beyond (John Benjamin Press, Amsterdam) and Chutnefying English: The Phenomenon of Hinglish (Penguin, forthcoming).